Radio National: Big Ideas Interview

Ex CIA spy Glenn Carle—’the interrogator’—talks to Paul Barclay about a top secret operation that went dreadfully wrong. An alleged al Qaeda kingpin terrorist was incarcerated for eight years, and subjected to what most of us would call torture, then released without charge, without apology, his life in ruins. All along, without success, Carle tried to convince the CIA they had the wrong man.


Click to listen to the audio.

Q&A Sydney Writers’ Festival

Q&A Sydney Writers’ Festival

Good evening and welcome to Q&A. I’m Tony Jones. Answering your question tonight former CIA agent Glenn Carle whose book The Interrogator has been heavily censored by his old employer; Australian writer, commentator and self-proclaimed demented mother Kathy Lette; Pulitzer Prize Winner, Jeffrey Eugenides, best known for the Virgin Suicides, Middlesex and The Marriage Plot; Russian journalist Masha Gessen, author of The Man Without a Face: The Unlikely Rise of Vladimir Putin and the Foreign Editor of The Australian, Greg Sheridan. Please welcome our panel.


Click to view the panel’s video.

Interview: A rare glimpse inside the shadowy world inside the CIA’s interrogation unit

Interview: A rare glimpse inside the shadowy world inside the CIA’s interrogation unit

Now a rare glimpse inside the shadowy world inside the CIA’s interrogation unit. A 23 year veteran of the agency Glenn Carle has just published a personal account of some of the CIA’s most disturbing investigation methods. It’s not surprising his former employers are not happy about this book. It’s been a 12 month battle to get it published. Aaron Lewis caught up with Glenn Carle in Washington just before he left for Australia to make his appearance at this week’s Sydney Writers’ Festival.

Click here to watch the video: http://www.sbs.com.au/dateline/story/watch/id/601465/n/The-Insider

Click here for the transcript: http://www.sbs.com.au/dateline/story/transcript/id/601465/n/The-Insider

Preventing Torture: Interview with Natasha Mitchell of ABC

Preventing Torture: Interview with Natasha Mitchell of ABC

Earlier this month the Court of Appeals in the US threw out a lawsuit filed against the man who wrote the so-called Torture Memos, John Yoo. The torture memos posited that so-called enhance interrogation techniques like waterboarding and sleep deprivation might be legally permissible and, among other abuses, led to the infamous mistreatment of prisoners at Abu Ghraib by US military police personnel. How is it that our supposedly liberal democratic governments engage in torture? What does it say about our political culture that this is an acceptable way to fight terrorism?

Source and audio: http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/lifematters/preventing-torture/4015400

Waleed Aly, Glenn Carle and Stella Rimington on the Conversation Hour

Waleed Aly, Glenn Carle and Stella Rimington on the Conversation Hour

Waleed Aly, a busy person and host of Radio National’s Drive program.

He’s also a part time lecturer at Monash University in the Global Terrorism Research Centre and perfect person to co-host today’s Conversation Hour.

Our guest today have has qualified access to information most of us will never see. They’ve worked within high level intelligence organisations on either side of the Atlantic. Organisations that are the subject of countless speculation, countless movie plots, conspiracy theories, covert operations, fiction and non-fiction books.

Glenn Carle has recently published his book The Interrogator.

He’s worked with the Central Intelligence Agency for 25 years and tells the “dark side” of the Bush Administration’s War on Terror.

Dame Stella Rimington is a spy fiction author. Her latest book is Rip Tide.

 

Click to hear the discussion.

Listen to Glenn’s conversation with Richard Fidler of ABC (Australia)

Listen to Glenn’s conversation with Richard Fidler of ABC (Australia)

Source (click to listen to audio): www.abc.net.au/local/stories/2012/05/14/3502192.htm

Glenn Carle worked for the CIA for 23 years, and in 2002 was offered a special assignment: to interrogate a ‘high value target’.

Broadcast date: Monday 14 May 2012

Glenn Carle’s last job with the CIA was working in anti-terrorism, which became hugely important after the World Trade Centre was attacked in 2001.

The high-value target he was sent to interrogate was thought to be Osama bin Laden’s banker.

Glenn’s years of training and experience led him eventually to believe that the CIA had the wrong man. He struggled to reconcile his orders to ‘make’ the suspect talk with the oath he had sworn to uphold the letter of the law.

By speaking out Glenn is now regarded by many as a traitor.

His book – heavily redacted on the orders of his former employer – is called The Interrogator: a CIA Agent’s True Story published by Scribe.

Gitmo insider’s book censored

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Gitmo insider’s book censored

This month marked the ten year anniversary of Guantanamo Bay and three years since President Obama said he would close down the controversial prison. It is no secret that Gitmo has had some bad PR, but still the prisons inter-workings are still very secretive. The policies at Gitmo are unknown by few and Glenn Carle, former CIA agent, joins us with some insight.

Johns Hopkins Magazine: The Wrong Man

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The interrogation room was bare except for a few metal chairs, and its tan walls looked as if they hadn’t been painted in decades. A single transom window stood cracked open slightly, but it couldn’t relieve the room’s stuffy air. Outside, beyond view, lay the hot, dusty streets of North Africa.

The prisoner—identified by the CIA as a top al-Qaida official—sat motionless, his salmon jumpsuit stretched across a middle-aged paunch. Glenn Carle, SAIS ’85, a career CIA spy, knelt before him. “We do not have much time,” Carle told the prisoner, whom he refers to by the code name CAPTUS. “The situation is changing.”

It was autumn of 2002, and Carle had been interrogating the man for weeks. During that time he’d gained the prisoner’s trust, using the same skills he’d honed as a case officer when he manipulated foreign nationals into revealing their countries’ secrets. Carle schmoozed, he chastised, he cajoled . . . whatever it took to ingratiate himself.

click here to view entire article…

Spy who refused to become the enemy

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Glenn Carle came home the other day, to Brookline, to the house where he grew up, to the house where four generations of his family made their home.

His parents are dead, Carle and his siblings are scattered, and so the house will be sold.

It is, for Carle, a week to remember so much.

Like everybody else in this country who has a pulse, today means something to Glenn Carle. When you and I and everybody else were looking at the smoldering ruins in Lower Manhattan, horrified and saddened and angry and wondering what life would be like after all this, Carle was working, because he was a spy, a CIA agent, and it was his job to find out who made 9/11 happen.

From Boston.com, click to read more.

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