Former CIA operative Glenn Carle’s memoir, The Interrogator

Former CIA operative Glenn Carle’s memoir, The Interrogator

Former CIA operative Glenn Carle was in charge of interrogating a high-level terror suspect as part of the War on Terror. Tonight, Carle joins Emily to talk about his new memoir, The Interrogator, and the moral boundaries he crossed in the name of national security.

Source: http://www.wgbh.org/programs/Greater-Boston-11/episodes/July-21-2011Former-CIA-operative-Glenn-Carles-memoir-The-Interrogator-30387

 

The lonely truth

The lonely truth

In a darkened room sits a man whom the American government says is a senior al Qaeda official. His interrogator, a long-serving CIA agent named Glenn Carle, thinks the man is far from a terrorist mastermind, but a bewildered halfwit. Carle’s handlers tell him the man’s silence proves he knows something, and insist “enhanced interrogation techniques” – many would say torture – will produce answers. Carle demurs, but is ignored, and his prisoner, while never entering a courtroom, will spend the next seven years in a secret jail far from American shores before his quiet release.

These are the bare facts of Carle’s book, The Interrogator, which in the year since its publication has destroyed his life. It has caused outrage everywhere except America, where it has been smothered by what he claims is an insidious whispering campaign by friends of former American vice- president Dick Cheney. “Every word,” he says, intensely. “Every f—–g word is true.”

They called his publisher, he says, asking them to pulp his book; they rang every major network to prevent him going on air. They are, he says several times, “vicious” and have perpetrated a stain on America’s national character.

And so Carle has begun to travel. He has been well received in Germany, Australia, Canada; he has come to New Zealand because the Star-Times wanted to interview him and he wanted to go hiking. Over lunch, he says: “They realised they could not keep me from every interview everywhere, so their strategy is to keep me from the major networks, then it doesn’t matter if I talk to some guy in Auckland, or some guy in Butte, Montana, for a radio station that reaches 500 shepherds, for ‘if we keep him off the major networks, then he does not exist’.”

For those who listen, he has an amazing tale of how the War on Terror warped America’s foreign policy and tested their laws and morals. Carle is bitter about the neocons, the new American right, who redefined what was acceptable, legally and morally, in these uncertain times. In particular, he despises George Bush’s deputy attorney-general, John Yoo, who wrote the “torture memo”, which permitted and claimed as legal such practices as sleep deprivation, binding in stress positions and waterboarding. Carle’s prisoner, in his book codenamed CAPTUS, was surely subject to some of these, despite no evidence ever being tabled to suggest he was not a low-level money-changer, rather than, as the CIA speculated, Osama bin Laden’s banker.

 

Click to read more: http://www.stuff.co.nz/world/americas/6996281/The-lonely-truth

Glenn L Carle’s Review of Ali Soufan book The Black Banners

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Real enemies will whisper about you. The murmurs and hisses to discredit Ali Soufan have echoed through the community of opinion makers and terrorism experts, and have even reached me. Shortly before Soufan’s book, The Black Banners, was published, a producer from a major media outlet spoke with me. “Was it true that Soufan had been a low-level FBI employee, who could not speak with authority about the nature of the terrorist threats to the United States because he lacked the necessary senior-level perspective? Wasn’t he exaggerating his knowledge and role? Wasn’t he a bit of a self-promoter?” the producer asked.

I could not help but smile to myself as I listened; the same character assassination had happened to me when my own book on interrogation and the War on Terror came out. I had been kept off a number of programs as a result. I also knew that Soufan already had been targeted this way several years earlier when his name first became public.I told the producer that Soufan’s career and mine had overlapped on many occasions, and although we had never to my knowledge met, in many instances I knew first-hand that Soufan’s description of events and policies were accurate.

Click here to read the entire article …

Boston.com Review

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Boston.com Review

Glenn Carle came home the other day, to Brookline, to the house where he grew up, to the house where four generations of his family made their home.

His parents are dead, Carle and his siblings are scattered, and so the house will be sold.

It is, for Carle, a week to remember so much.

Like everybody else in this country who has a pulse, today means something to Glenn Carle. When you and I and everybody else were looking at the smoldering ruins in Lower Manhattan, horrified and saddened and angry and wondering what life would be like after all this, Carle was working, because he was a spy, a CIA agent, and it was his job to find out who made 9/11 happen…

Read entire article here …

The CIA Interrogator – Interview with Glenn Carle (ZMAN Magazine)

The CIA Interrogator – Interview with Glenn Carle (ZMAN Magazine)

The 9/11 attacks changed America forever. No longer would it be enough to wait for terror to come to the US. It was time to take the battle to the terrorists themselves. Central to this effort was a campaign to identify and abduct terror suspects, whisking them off the street to secret locations and employing all methods necessary to extract information from them that might be used to save innocent lives.

 

Click to download the article

thestar.com reviews the interrogator

thestar.com reviews the interrogator

The plot goes like this: A CIA agent is given the task of interrogating a prisoner who is believed to be a high-ranking member of Al Qaeda and could lead the U.S. to Osama bin Laden. The prisoner has been kidnapped off the street in an unnamed Middle Eastern country.

The only problem? Over the course of the interrogation, the agent concludes the CIA has the wrong man. He advises his masters of his conclusions.

But the CIA doesn’t listen. It instructs the agent to press harder. The spy agency believes the prisoner’s refusal to answer certain questions is proof of his guilt.

When he still fails to reveal anything, the CIA sends both the prisoner, known as Captus, and his interrogator to Hotel California — the CIA’s most secret detention centre — where the prisoner is tortured.

A page-turner, right? Well, this tale is not the creation of a master of spy thrillers. Glenn Carle, a former CIA officer with 23 years in the service, lived it….

Read the entire review here

Uncle Sam’s secrets

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Uncle Sam’s secrets

Truth, justice and the American way are subjective ideals – not absolutes – a lesson this spy-turned-author learnt, writes Steve Meacham.

It’s no secret Glenn Carle’s revealing autobiography, The Interrogator: A CIA Agent’s True Story, is unlike most books. Large parts of his 300-odd page account are blacked out. Sometimes it is just a word or two, sometimes it’s virtually an entire page.

The deletions – or ”redacted passages” in CIA-speak – were ordered by the Central Intelligence Agency. Although Carle retired in March 2007 after 23 years as a spy – or member of the agency’s ”Clandestine Service” – he had promised to publish nothing about his experiences without vigorous official vetting.

So the book comes with a warning: ”All statements of fact, opinion, or analysis expressed are those of the author and do not reflect the official positions or views of the CIA or any other US government agency. Nothing in the contents should be construed as asserting or implying US government authentication of information or Agency endorsement of the author’s views. This material has been reviewed by the CIA to prevent the disclosure of classified information.”

Read more at www.smh.com.au

Journey into the CIA’s heart of darkness: Ex-agent reveals ‘torture’ of terror suspect in secret prison dubbed ‘Hotel California’

From the Sunday London Times: A former CIA operative has described how he was torn between serving his country and refusing to ‘torture’ a man he believed was innocent.

Glenn Carle has written a shocking new tell-all memoir detailing his time with the agency in which he confessed that some people would call him a ‘torturer’.

Though the CIA has already redacted 40 per cent of his book in a two-year battle to get it published, Carle was still able to provide a vivid account of his journey to a CIA ‘black site’ or secret prison.

There, he said, he spent 10 intense days psychologically manipulating a man who the agency believed could hand them Osama Bin Laden – but who Carle believed was innocent.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2010485/I-psychologically-dislocate-detainee-Former-CIA-agent-reveals-torture-methods-secret-prison-memoir.html#ixzz1yjs6ZVhW

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